Colonial History Student “A Little Too Fond” of Playing Devil’s Advocate

A student of British descent has been called “unusually suspect” due to his penchant for playing devil’s advocate in his Colonial History tutorial. The student, who will remain unnamed, has frequently aroused suspicions in his peers for “theoretically” defending his homeland’s colonial past.

 

 

Just last week, he went about taking on the role of administrators of British India, stating that hypothetically, dividing the territory along religious lines was “the most logical way to do it”.

 

In another instance, he – once again, hypothetically – argued that sugarcane cultivation had positive effects on Caribbean culinary tradition. 

 

The course’s T.A. confessed to The Boundary that the student’s essay on the effects of colonialism in developing countries left her deeply puzzled.

 

“He just… doesn’t get it”, said the Teaching Assistant.

 

The course’s instructor has been informed of the student’s behaviour and believes it might be best to intervene before the upcoming week’s module on the Chinese Opium Wars.

 

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The Boundary is the University of Toronto's Satire Paper